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"The movie business is macabre. Grotesque.
It is a combination of a football game
and a brothel."
-- Federico Fellini
Feb 152017
 

AVAILABLE FEBRUARY 21

fox-vault-nightmareNightmare Alley (1947)
In this engaging melodrama, Stanton Carlisle (Tyrone Power) is a lowlife working in a carnival. Knowing a good con when he sees one, he learns the tricks of a mind-reading act from Zeena (Joan Blondell), then tosses her aside. In time, he becomes “The Great Stanton,” star attraction of swanky nightclubs and the darling of society. But with all his notoriety built on lies, it’s only a matter of time before exposure brings Stanton’s world crashing down around him.

Captain from Castile (1947)
Forced to flee his home during the Spanish Inquisition, nobleman Pedro De Vargas escapes with a beautiful peasant girl and joinsCortz on his dangerous expedition to conquer Mexico, as the young couple fall deeply in love, Pedro's great courage brings his leader honor and glory with every challenge, even as an evil officer threatens the success of the entire expedition.

Prince of Foxes (1949)    
In Renaissance Italy, power-hungry Cesare Borgia (Orson Welles) dispatches his spy-soldier Andrea Orsini (Tyrone Power) to a small territory Cesare hopes to capture. But Orsini becomes captivated by the intelligence and charm of the territory’s Duke and his young wife, and is soon embroiled in a fierce and spectacular battle that forces him to confront his ideas of justice and nobility.

Dangerous Crossing (1953)
A young bride is set to begin her honeymoon aboard a luxury liner. Her happiness does not last when she finds that her husband has disappeared. Trouble is, no one else ever saw him board the ship with her and his name has mysteriously dropped from the passenger list.

fox-vault-guadacanalGuadalcanal Diary (1943)
One of the greatest war movies of all time, combining action-packed, high-caliber battle sequences with quintessential foxhole-buddy camaraderie. Released in 1943, its authenticity and power remain undiminished. The story follows one squad of Marines through the bloody assaults on the Solomon Islands during the opening stages of the war in the South Pacific. There's the tough sergeant (Lloyd Nolan), a cab driver from Brooklyn (William Bendix), a Mexican (Anthony Quinn) and a chaplain (Preston Foster). A battle-weary narrator reads from a diary, commenting on the typical grunt's everyday life, and death. Battles and dates of engagement are named, putting the explosive action into a solid historical context. Based on Richard Tregaski's best-selling book, the script is by renowned screenwriter Lamar Trotti, who also wrote the screenplay for the wartime classic "To the Shore of Tripoli."

13 Rue Madeleine (1946)
Hollywood legend James Cagney stars as Bob Sharkey, an O.S.S. (Office of Strategic Services) officer seeking out a purported German spy within the O.S.S. ranks. At the same time, he is in the midst of a highly dangerous espionage mission that is crucial to an Allied victory. When one of his own officers is murdered, Cagney is convinced that the spy is someone close to him and vows revenge. Authentic O.S.S. footage from WWII adds to the excitement and polish of 13 RUE MADELEINE. The film was directed by Henry Hathaway.

House on Telegraph Hill (1951)     
Victoria has survived Nazi concentration by assuming the identity of one who died there. She arrives in San Francisco to see her "Son" just as the boy's great-Aunt dies leaving a lot of money to be inherited. Victoria falls in love with the boy's trustee Alan Spender, and they move into the mansion on Telegraph Hill. She then learns that Alan and his lover, the boy's governess Margaret, murdered an aunt and are planning the same for her.

fox-vault-bandoleroBandolero (1968)
It’s a Wild West clash of personalities in Val Verde, Texas for the warring Bishop Brothers (Dean Martin and James Stewart), who must now join forces to escape a death sentence. Exploding with action and featuring an all-star cast, including Raquel Welch and George Kennedy, Bandolero! packs a smoking six-gun wallop from its first, tense showdown to its last, exciting shoot-out.

Moontide (1942)
Forced to flee Paris during the Occupation, the great French leading man Jean Gabin starred in a brace of Hollywood films, the best of which was the first, 20th Century-Fox's MOONTIDE. Cast to type, Gabin plays Bobo, a brooding itinerant dock-worker who gets mixed up in a drunken brawl. Upon awakening, Bobo is convinced that he has killed a man by his mercenary "pal" Tiny (Thomas Mitchell). Despairing at the thought of having committed murder, not to mentioned being blackmailed for the rest of his life by the treacherous Tiny, Bobo is able to find a few fleeting moments of happiness with Anna (Ida Lupino), a suicidal young girl whom he has saved from a watery grave (The intensity of the love scenes may well be due to the allegedly real-life romance between Jean Gabin and Ida Lupino). Novelist John O'Hara adapted the screenplay from a book by actor Willard Robertson.

Son of Fury (1942)
Entitled to inherit his deceased father's estate and title, child aristocrat Benjamin Blake (Roddy McDowall) is instead kept as a bond-servant to his villainous uncle (George Sanders). When Blake, now a young man (Tyrone Power), is beaten for falling in love with his uncle's daughter (Frances Farmer), he escapes by ship where he learns of a pearl fortune on a South Pacific island. There, he leads an idyllic life with a native girl (Gene Tierney) until he is compelled to return home and recapture what is rightfully owed him.

 Posted by on February 15, 2017  Add comments

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